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Brazil
Brazil - An Inconvenient History
Favela Rising
Frustrated Black American Men in Brazil
Sao Paulo - Megacities
Reparation
City of God, Guns & Gangs
Risking it all - Brazil
Slave Nation - Brazil
Fighting for a Seat at the Table - Brazil
City Life - Brazil
Mean Streets - Brazil
Black Pride - Brazil
Rio - Candelaria Massacre - Brazil
Favela Wars - Brazil
Inside Story - Battling Rio's drug gangs
People and Power- Peace in the favelas
Gems TV Brazil
Ten years after 9/11 - (ESPN Brazil documentary)
Brazil Report on Torture - 1971
Black in Latin America E02, Brazil: A Racial Paradise
Brazil's Racial Quotas
Brazil - Dancers
Open Arms Closed Doors - Brazil
Rio De Janeiro - Brazil - Power Grid - Build It Bigger
Brazilian Landless Rural Peasants - Reality
Brazil's People of the Arrow
Dancing with the Devil
O "JOGO" ( The game ) Documentary about Brazilian Soccer
Gilberto Gil - Divine and Marvellous - Brazil
Hard Talk - Gilberto Gil
Garrincha - Joy of the People
Gold Digger - Worlds Biggest Bank Robbery
Mini Monkeys of Brazil
Brazil in Black and White
Children For Sale - Brazil
The Charcoal People (1999) Brasil Deforestation
Winning Against Aids - Brazil
Brazil's Sweet Revolution
Doing The Right Thing - Brazil
Coelho's Land - Brazil
Nuns Vs Guns - Brazil
Salvador Jam

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Description

Brazil

From Wikipedia

Brazil, officially the Federative Republic of Brazil, is the largest country in both South America and the Latin America region. It is the world's fifth largest country, both by geographical area and by population, with over 193 million people. It is the largest Lusophone country in the world, and the only one in the Americas.

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The Brazilian economy is the world's seventh largest by nominal GDP and the seventh largest by purchasing power parity, as of 2012. Brazil is one of the world's fastest growing major economies, and its economic reforms have given the country new international recognition and influence. Brazil is a founding member of the United Nations, the G20, CPLP, Latin Union, the Organization of Ibero-American States, the Organization of American States, Mercosul and the Union of South American Nations, and is one of the BRIC countries. Brazil is also one of the 17 megadiverse countries, home to diverse wildlife, natural environments, and extensive natural resources in a variety of protected habitats. Brazil is considered a middle power in international affairs, and has been identified as a potential superpower

Brazil - An Inconvenient History

Favela Rising
documents a man and a movement, a city divided and a favela (Brazilian squatter settlement) united. Haunted by the murders of his family and many of his friends, Anderson Sá is a former drug-trafficker who turns social revolutionary in Rio de Janeiro's most feared slum. Through hip-hop music, the rhythms of the street, and Afro-Brazilian dance he rallies his community to counteract the violent oppression enforced by teenage drug armies and sustained by corrupt police.

At the dawn of liberation, just as collective mobility is overcoming all odds and Anderson's grassroots Afro Reggae movement is at the height of its success, a tragic accident threatens to silence the movement forever.

Frustrated Black American Men in Brazil
Al Greeze decided to produce Frustrated after reading a September 2006 Essence Magazine article (Blame it On Rio) written by Professor William Jelani Cobb, which stated that African men were travelling to Brazil for sex vacations with Brazilian prostitutes and the adulation of the Brazilian women Greeze wanted to either confirm or deny and reveal the answers from the men themselves and find out if it is for love and companionship or just sex. The effect may have been suspected but what is the cause?

Through research, personal accounts and testimonies from the men who fall in love or date Brazilian women and the reaction and opinions of the women both in the U.S. and in Brazil, the film touches and unlocks some heartfelt emotions to these complex issues including the economic and educational divide between the sexes and the possibly unachievable roles each places on the other. Although the film exams the controversial topic of relationships outside of the African American race and the country, the film's goal is to elicit open conversation and communication amongst men and women, strengthen the family dynamic and give both sides a platform to give an honest account.

Frustrated ask such questions as why are African American men finding love outside of their race, what do they feel is missing from African American woman and are African American women now in competition with Brazilian women as they are with other races...is there really a threat, or are the women saying good riddance we don't need you or are they fighting for their men?

Sao Paulo - Megacities
More than 10 million people live in São Paulo and every day, they generate 14,000 tons of garbage. But São Paulo is undergoing a green revolution. Follow one aluminum can from the time it id picked up by one of the catadores (trash-pickers, who make their living from collecting recyclables) through pressing, melting, and e-melting, to the moment it is ready to become a new can.
São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil, the largest city in the southern hemisphere and Americas, and the world's eighth largest city by population. The metropolis is anchor to the São Paulo metropolitan area, ranked as the second most populous metropolitan area in the Americas and among the ten largest metropolitan areas on the planet. São Paulo is the capital of the state of São Paulo, which is the most populous Brazilian state, and exerts strong regional influence in commerce and finance as well as arts and entertainment. São Paulo maintains a strong international influence. The name of the city honors Saint Paul of Tarsus.
São Paulo has the second largest economy, by GDP, among Latin American and Brazilian cities. Its GDP per capita is the fifth highest among the larger Latin American cities as well as second highest in Brazil, behind only Brasília.
The metropolis has significant cultural, economic and political influence both nationally and internationally. It is home to several important monuments, parks and museums such as the Latin American Memorial, the Museum of the Portuguese Language, São Paulo Museum of Art, Museum of Ipiranga and the Ibirapuera Park. Paulista Avenue is the most important financial center of São Paulo. The city holds many high profile events, like the São Paulo Art Biennial, the Brazil Grand Prix Formula 1 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo Fashion Week, ATP Brasil Open, and the São Paulo Indy 300. Sao Paulo hosts the world's largest gay pride parade according to the Guinness Book of World Records.
It is home to the São Paulo Stock Exchange, the Future Markets, and the Cereal Market Stock Exchanges (the second largest stock exchange in the World, in market value). São Paulo has been home to several of the tallest buildings in Brazil, including the building Mirante do Vale, Italia, Altino Arantes, North Tower of the UNSCOM (United Nations Centre Enterprise) and many others.
People from the city of São Paulo are known as paulistanos, while paulistas designates anyone from the whole of São Paulo state, including the paulistanos. The city's Latin motto, which it has shared with the battleship and the aircraft carrier named after it, is Non ducor, duco, which translates as "I am not led, I lead."
The city, which is also colloquially known as "Sampa" or "Cidade da Garoa" (city of drizzle), is also known for its unreliable weather, the size of its helicopter fleet, its architecture, gastronomy, severe traffic congestion, and multitude of skyscrapers. The city is considered an Alpha World City according to the Global City economic system. São Paulo is expected to have the 2nd biggest economic growth in the world, until 2025.

Reparation
A documentary that narrates the seek of justice of a terrorist attack victim during the Military Regime in Brazil's 1960s.

For the first time in Brazil's Cinema trajectory, a feature film shows both sides of a violent time: the Military repression and the extremist terrorism. Reparation is the title of the HD feature documentary that tells the life story of Orlando Lovecchio. In 1968, he
was made victim of a guerilla's bomb terrorist attack, which main objective was to fight against the Military Regime. Orlando lost one leg after the world-reckoned attack against the U.S. Consulate in São Paulo and could no longer pursue his dream of becoming an aircraft pilot.Until now, over 30 years later, he still fights for justice. Not legally considered a "victim of the Military Dictatorship," Orlando earns a lower compensation in comparison with the terrorist's compensation, this one formerly named a "victim" of that time. This unique life story has been highlighted by the Brazilian press for years and years. Upon this, Reparation seeks for a reflexion on the Military Regime, on the violence of the extremist groups from former and current guerillas in Latin America, on the Cuban Dictatorship -- that lasts until today under the complacency of the continent's "democracy" and on the conflictual relationship between the repressive State and
the common citizens. With the testimonials from Brazil's former President
Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Historian Marco Antonio Villa, Journalist Demétrio Magnolli, among others, Reparation wishes to commence an unheard of discussion over the Military times inside Brazil's Cinema context, which has been failing to show both sides of this particular moment, usually in a Manichaean manner, as if History itself was a simple dispute between "good" and "evil." With a frank and open approach, with no political or ideological partiality, Reparation proves to be fully independent as it was not subsidized by any public patronage for its accomplishment. A solid proof that the Brazilian Cinema can be argumentative with technical quality and freedom of thought and aesthetics.

City of God, Guns & Gangs
Dec 24, 2012
For decades, Rio de Janeiro's sprawling favelas (slums) have been under the control of heavily armed drug gangs. But now, the government of Brazil wants to take them back, and reform one of the world's most unequal and violent cities. The plan is part of a bold new initiative to give Brazil's most picturesque city a face lift before the world turns its eyes on the country for the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016. Correspondent Mariana van Zeller finds out that the traditional rulers of Rio's favelas are not ceding control without a fight. The government of Brazil has promised to continue its campaign, and provide a blueprint for one of the most pressing and perplexing questions in our increasingly urban world: how to transform, develop and integrate sprawling, often crime-ridden slums.

Risking it all - Brazil
May 19, 2011
Brazilian children at the Tajaparu river risk getting cut to pieces as they fasten their canoes onto fast-moving tourist boats in order to sell their goods. They are risking death in order to make a few pennies selling sweets and jams.

Slave Nation - Brazil
August 2005
It's been over a century since Brazil officially abandoned slavery. But tens of thousands of impoverished workers are still being enslaved.

Every year, some 50,000 slaves turn an area of the Amazon the size of Switzerland into a wasteland. Brazil's labour laws count for little in a country where the landowners are omnipotent "There's a culture of impunity," laments judge Leah Sarmento. "There are very rich and powerful people who expect to be able to buy anyone." She's received several death threats for prosecuting slave traders. "When the workers run up bills they can't pay, the Gatos, or labour foreman, come in and pay the bills. From that point on, he owns them," states anti slavery campaigner Henri des Rozier. But landowners deny that slavery exists and claim the allegations are invented by state subsidised European farmers.

Fighting for a Seat at the Table - Brazil
8 January 2001
For more than a decade Brazil has opened itself to the global economy. Yet still the richest ten per cent of its people take half the nation's income while the poorest 40 per cent live on less than two dollars a day. The measures Brazil has taken to save its currency -- steps that have thus far satisfied fast-moving global markets -- are hurting the poor and the lower middle class. What's happening in Brazil graphically poses the question of whether global economic pressures exact too high a cost in societies that are already among the most unequal in the world.

City Life - Brazil
April 2004
By 2030 60% of the world's population will live in cities. But will the cities have the infrastructure to cope?

Mean Streets - Brazil
August 2006
Open warfare has broken out in Sao Paolo between the police and criminal gangs. Hundreds have been gunned down in execution style killings and the carnage looks set to continue.

A notorious gang, the PCC, runs Sao Paolo's overcrowded jails. When news was leaked of a plan to break their power, all hell broke loose. They ordered their contacts to kill all policemen and 43 were gunned down. "How can it be that a man who's in jail commands everything that goes on out here?" despairs one victims' father. In retaliation, police death squads killed 400. Now, the fear is the killings will continue. As Prof. Ignacio states "We will probably see a worsening of prison conditions. This will trigger a harder reaction from criminal gangs leading us further into this vicious circle."

Produced by SBS/Dateline
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

Black Pride - Brazil
April 1996
It's carnival time! The people are swaying to their drumbeats, marching on a wave of music through the streets of Brazil.

But life isn't always so harmonious. For Black Brazilians the battle against apartheid is only just beginning. Though slavery was abolished 107 years ago, power still rests with the fair skinned. A decade ago, the Olodum movement took black culture and black music to the carnival for the first time. Other movements have developed like the Ax'e group which rescues abandoned children from the streets. At the refuge they can play football, free from drugs, violence and the police. In dilapidated shanty towns, people are questioning their inferior status. As children splash in the muddy water, parents are rejecting the white Brazilian ideal promoted by the mass media. Maria de Lourdes from the Unified Black Movement concludes, "we Negroes need to become conscious of our situation, but Brazilian society needs to change too."

Produced by ABC Australia
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

Rio - Candelaria Massacre - Brazil
March 1996
Locked behind barbed wire and treated like a common criminal lives Wagner dos Santos in Brazil - the key witness in the Candelaria massacre. He was shot 3 times in the head and dumped in a field because he happened to be present when the military police gunned down 8 street children. The reason for the massacre? Because a boy hit one policeman with a stone when he was being arrested for stealing glue. Wagner lives under government protection. Thirty days after the Candelaria massacre, the death squad of the 9th Rio battalion opened fire in Vigario Geral, one of the poorest slums north of Rio. Amongst the stagnant water, the cardboard shacks and the rubbish, one survivor recounts the brutal murder of her entire family. Debilitated by facial paralysis, sight and hearing problems, Wagner is still determined that the police should be punished for what they have done.

Favela Wars - Brazil
June 2003
The violence spilling out of Brazil's slums or 'favelas' has made the country's two major cities more dangerous than most war zones. Children in Rio de Janeiro are eight times more likely to die violently than those in the West Bank. "They live on a kill or be killed basis," states anthropologist Luke Dowdney, who has spent five years studying the favelas. "If they don't kill someone when they're told to, they will be killed."

Produced by ABC Australia
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

Inside Story - Battling Rio's drug gangs
Nov 28, 2010
Dozens of people have been killed in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil's second largest city, in a massive week-long crackdown on drug gangs. Authorities say the violence started when jailed gang leaders ordered their followers to attack police stations. But it could also be part of major clean-up operation as Brazil prepares to host the 2014 Fifa World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. Can the government win this battle and how powerful are these gangs?

People and Power- Peace in the favelas
Nov 3, 2010
For decades Brazil's favelas - or shanty towns - have been a deadly battleground, where thousands died in the turf wars of rival gangsters and drug lords.
But two years ago - in anticipation of the football World Cup in 2014 and the 2016 Summer Olympics, the Brazilian government launched a new initiative.
Since then the Police Pacifying Units (UPP), have moved into 12 favelas, freeing 150,000 people from the control of the gangs and bringing a new calm to embattled neighbourhoods.
But as filmmakers Dom Rotheroe and Alfonso Daniels found out - while most residents in the UPP-controlled favelas welcome the fragile peace others fear it may not last.

Gems TV Brazil
May 25, 2012
Join Steve Bennett as he pushes deep into the Brazillian countryside in the search of the exclusive Tourmaline and Rubellite gemstones.
On his adventures he also comes across many other gemstones including a church made from Amethyst and Matt Bennett goes to Ouro Preto in search of Imperial Topaz.

Ten years after 9/11 - (ESPN Brazil documentary)
Dec 27, 2011
A brazillian documentary film covering the 9-11 phenomenon from the perspective of 2011.

Brazil Report on Torture - 1971
After the kidnapping of the Swiss Ambassador in Brazil in 1970, 70 political prisoners were released from Brazilian prisons and set free in Chile on an exchange agreement. The directors of this film, Haskell Wexler and Saul Landau, went to Chile and recorded first-hand interviews with the former prisoners, revealing the torture that was part of everyday routine interrogation in Brazilian prisons. The film shows reenactments of waterboarding, "pau de arara" and other medieval and modern "procedures" administered by Brazil's military government.

Director: Saul Landau & Haskel Wexler | Producer: Saul Landau & Haskel Wexler

Black in Latin America E02, Brazil: A Racial Paradise
In Brazil, Professor Gates delves behind the façade of Carnival to discover how this 'rainbow nation' is waking up to its legacy as the world's largest slave economy.

Brazil's Racial Quotas
May 17, 2012
We discuss Brazil's "racial democracy" and newly approved racial quotas.

Brazil - Dancers
British documentary about Brazilian slum dancers is screened in Rio favelas.

Open Arms Closed Doors - Brazil
Brazil's booming economy brings many African migrants to its shores, but once there does the dream of a better life die?

The booming economic juggernaut in Brazil has transformed lives. It has also acted as a beacon attracting migrants from all over the world, including the former Portuguese colony of Angola.
Expecting to find a vast multicultural embrace, Angolan immigrant Badharo instead finds barriers and even racism in Rio.
So he turns to music as a way to express his disappointment, pain and outrage.
Set against the tragic death of a young Angolan student, we experience the frustrations Badharo and his family face as their Brazilian dreams encounter a very different reality.

Among those migrants leaving Africa, particularly Angolans, Brazil has become an increasingly popular destination over the traditional choice of Europe - due in part to a shared history as a Portuguese colony but also in light of recent economic hurdles and a rising wave of xenophobia in Europe.

Brazil's booming economy coupled with attractive immigration policies and support for student visas, has also served to draw in these migrants. However, there has been a spike in racism and violence targeting the black population of Brazil, including these Angolan migrants.

Since 2008, the rate of homicides involving young black men is 127.6 percent higher than those involving whites.

Rio De Janeiro - Brazil - Power Grid - Build It Bigger
A massive hydroelectric project in Brazil has workers tunneling through seven mountains and building two dams.
Brazil is building one of the largest hydroelectric projects in the world, tunneling through 7 mountains and building 2 dams, all to create enough power to keep Rio de Janeiro from going dark during the upcoming Olympics and World Cup.
When the lights go out these days in Brazil, the one word that Energy Minister Edison Lobão doesn't want to hear is apagão, or "blackout."

The word took on multiple meanings for citizens in the world's fifth largest nation after crippling power outages and government-mandated energy rationing in the early 2000s. Any massive failure of government or corporate officialdom-from plane delays to shortages of skilled workers-came to be branded as apagão. In last year's national elections, before Dilma Rousseff won the presidency in a runoff, there was vigorous dispute on Twitter over apagão, and which party had left more people in the dark most often. And last February, when 50 million people lost electricity for hours in the impoverished northeast, Lobão said it should not be considered an apagão, but a "temporary interruption of the electricity supply."

Keenly aware of domestic pressure over reliable electricity service, and knowing that the world will be watching as Brazil hosts both the World Cup and the Olympics within the next five years, public and private officials are working to bolster power delivery. But solutions are not easy in this sprawling country, South America's largest nation. While faced with feeding one of the world's largest cities, São Paulo, Brazil also is steward both to the Amazon and to more rural poor than any other nation in the Western Hemisphere. Brazil is roiled by conflict between city and village, development and preservation, as it considers how to fuel its economy and deliver future energy.

Brazilian Landless Rural Peasants - Reality
Since he arrived in Brazil's Mato Grosso, Pere Casaldàliga has devoted himself to the fight for the rights of the landless rural peasants and indigenous people. In both cases, his struggle has brought him up against the large estates.

This documentary describes the fight of a group of over 1000 landless peasant families who have been living in makeshift camps for over five years in the middle of nowhere in Mato Grosso, waiting for the Brazilian justice to grant them the ownership of a "fazenda" (rural estate). They are not alone in their struggle, however, as Casaldàliga is guiding them and has become a moral point of reference in defence of the group's rights.

Brazil's People of the Arrow
Jan 16, 2012
Journey with author Scott Wallace deep into the Amazon rain forest in search of one of the last uncontacted tribes on Earth.

Dancing with the Devil

O "JOGO" ( The game ) Documentary about Brazilian Soccer
Inde Documentary on the basic training of Brazilian Soccer held in June 2007.
English subtitles
Documentário independente sobre a formação de base do futebol Brasileiro realizado em junho 2007.
Legendado em Inglês

Gilberto Gil - Divine and Marvellous - Brazil
July 2005
Gilberto Gil is one of the most popular musicians in Brazil. Born in 1944, Gil grew up with music, but also with political oppression. He soon gained a reputation in the 1960s as a activist against the far-right establishment, using music as a last form of dissent. In the end, he found hmself exiled by the government, and though he mixed with pop giants in London during the 1970s such as Pink Floyd and Jimi Hendrix, it was of course with Brazil that his heart really lay. Since the first electoral victory of a left-wing Brazilian party for the first time in forty years last year, Gil's enduring popularity among his countrymen has earned him a place in government, as Minister of Culture. In this heart-warming film, Gil, now 61, speaks frankly about the difficult years in his life, the people he has met along the way, his attitude towards Brazilian politics and activism, and his feelings about the apparent disparity between his once anti-establishment opinions and his position in government today.

Produced by SBS/Dateline
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

Hard Talk - Gilberto Gil
Oct 30, 2008
Hard Talk - Gilberto Gil

Garrincha - Joy of the People
Manuel Francisco dos Santos
(October 28, 1933 -- January 20, 1983),
(known by the nickname "Garrincha", "little bird"), was an association football right winger and forward who helped the Brazil national team win the World Cups of 1958 and 1962. He played the majority of his professional career for the Brazilian club Botafogo.

The word garrincha itself means wren. Garrincha was also known as Mané (short for Manuel) by his friends. The combined "Mané Garrincha" is common among fans in Brazil. Due to his immense popularity in Brazil, he was also called Alegria do Povo (Joy of the People) and Anjo de Pernas Tortas (Angel with Bent Legs).

Garrincha is regarded by many as the best dribbler in football history. In the Estádio do Maracanã the home team room is known as "Garrincha," while the visiting team room is known as "Pelé."

Known for his remarkable ball control, imagination, dribbling skills and ability to create something from nothing, Garrincha also possessed a ferocious shot with either foot and was a gifted dead ball specialist known for free kicks and corners taken with the outside of his foot. However, it was his astonishing dribbling skills he was most famous for, a skill he retained throughout his career. Examples of his shooting ability are his goals in World Cups against England in 1962 and Bulgaria in 1966. He was also able to turn on himself at top speed and explode at unusual angles, which he used to great effect. The numerous attacks and goal opportunities he generated through individual plays would often end up in an accurate pass to a teammate in a position to score. This occurred in the first two of Brazil's goals in the 1958 World Cup final and the second goal against Spain in the 1962 tournament. He was also an excellent header of the ball despite his relatively short stature. He is one of a few players to have scored direct from a corner, a feat he managed to do 4 times in his career.

He was voted into the FIFA Team of the 20th century by 250 of the world's most respected football writers and journalists as one of the three best forwards of the 20th century.

He is often credited for having been the inspiration for the bull fighting chants of "ole" to be used at football grounds initially during a game in Argentina where he constantly teased and went past his markers to constant ole's from the crowd.

Gold Digger - Worlds Biggest Bank Robbery

Mini Monkeys of Brazil
Aug 23, 2010

We all know of the Amazon rain forest. But there was once another great forest in Brazil the Atlantic Rain Forest. Today there's only 2% of it remaining and the mini monkeys that once lived there are struggling for survival.

When you talk of Brazil's wildlife you tend to think of the Amazon rain forest. But few peole realise there is, or was once another forest just a big and just as bio diverse. The Atlantic rain forest.

It strech for more than 1000 miles along the Atlantic coast and inland to the eastern boarders of Brazil. Today there is less then 2% of the amazing forest and the wildlife that used to exist there is albut gone.

Those species that remain are fighting for survival, teetering on the edge of extinction. Species like the Golden Lion tamerine, the Wooley Spider Monkey, and many many more.

In this episode of Before It's Too Late we look at the many Mini Monkeys of Brazil who are fighting for surtvival.

Unfortunatley history is about to repeat itself. Because we have failed to learn from our mistakes of the past. Because what happened to the Atlantic forest is happening to the Amazon.

We meet the people in the south of the country who are battling to save the Golden Lion tamarines, and the Wooley Spider monkey. We see wonderful vision of the animals in the wild. But many of the tamarins weren't born in the wild they were born in zoos around the world and shipped back to re populate the forest. We see them being taught how to suvive in the wild. We also discover that there is no more room left for them. The remaining forest fragments are now full.

We also mee the people in the Amazon who are trying to stop the destruction of the rain forest there. We see the beautiful pied faced tamarins and many other species of mini monkeys including species that have only just been discovered and aren't even named yet.

Storyteller produce and distribute documentaries and factual programming specialising in animals and nature; from endangered species and what's being done to save them to mysterious animal and monster stories.

Brazil in Black and White
Mar 11, 2012
"Am I black or am I white?" Even before they ever set foot in a college classroom, many Brazilian university applicants must now confront a question with no easy answer.

BRAZIL IN BLACK AND WHITE follows the lives of five young college hopefuls from diverse backgrounds as they compete to win a coveted spot at the elite University of Brasilia, where 20 percent of the incoming freshmen must qualify as Afro-Brazilian. Outside the university, WIDE ANGLE reports on the controversial racial debate roiling Brazil through profiles of civil right activists, opponents of affirmative action, and one of the country's few black senators.

PBS Airdate: Tuesday, September 4th

Children For Sale - Brazil
April 2010
Brazil has a lot more to offer than just amazing beaches and remarkable beauty. The many slums are disgraced by child sex trafficking, hundreds of thousands of girls and boys are bought, sold or kidnapped each year.

The Charcoal People (1999) Brasil Deforestation
Nov 22, 2011
The most amazing thing about this documentary is that it was made at all, i.e., that the companies that produce charcoal used to make pig iron for (primarily automobile) manufacturers in the US, Europe, and Japan allowed the filmmakers access to the laborers who work for them at all, since they surely would have realized that a documentary about deforestation surely would not have been sympathetic. That having been said, this documentary makes it clear that deforestation is a problem to which there is no easy solution. As devastating as deforestation is, it provides a living to those who perform the work, and, as one worker after another states, this is the only work they can get. (A problem, by the way, that I am sure is not limited to Brazil.) The interviews are especially poignant. We see a lithe 76 year old man working as hard as his younger counterparts. We learn of the exploitation of these workers by some employers. We see a 16 year old wife of one of the workers who looks as if she is 30, with 2 children and another on the way. It also becomes abundantly clear that if deforestation is stopped, something for which the film makes a plea, then the Brazilian government will have to find an alternative for these people. This should not be missed.

Winning Against Aids - Brazil
January 2000
Five years ago, the World Bank forecast that Brazil would have 1.2 million HIV-positive people by this year. The Brazilian government responded with a series of bold moves involving the health service and citizens groups across the nation. As a result, the actual number infected is believed to be only 600,000 - half what was forecast. At the heart of Brazil's success is its drug-distribution programme.

Doing The Right Thing - Brazil
February 2001
Porto Alegre - capital of Brazil's southernmost state of Rio Grande do Sul - was once a run-of-the mill, dirty, Brazilian port city. With the fastest growing economy in Brazil, the state of Rio Grande do Sul attracts immigrants from many other poorer regions of the country who come in search of work and a better future. The state has a history of fierce independence, including a breakaway movement to form a separate nation.

Coelho's Land - Brazil
September 1999
A revolution is taking place in Brazil's arid interior as thirsty land-less peasants demand land reform.

Nuns Vs Guns - Brazil
May 2006
Ranchers illegally carving up the Amazon are resorting to force to secure their profits. In the past 30 years, hundreds of indigenous farmers who oppose them have been murdered.

Sister Leonora Brunetto only travels with bodyguards. She's received numerous death threats because of her work with the landless poor and several of her colleagues are now dead. "They were caught by surprise and executed", she laments. All over the Amazon, conflicts like this are being fought. On the one side are the impoverished farmers supported by the Catholic Church; on the other, the big ranchers determined to evict them and steal their land. "It's very hard to face the struggle 24 hours a day", explains one settler. Were it not for Sister Brunetta, she would have given up long ago. The Amazon was settled so quickly and haphazardly that few people have secure titles to their plots of land. With no proof of ownership, farmers can easily be evicted. Since the 1970s, when the first roads were built into the Amazon, Brazil has been rapaciously developing its vast rainforest. Environmentalists fear that things will only get worse following the announcement of plans to build the first paved highway. As Father Amoro questions: "Will things always be the same or are more people going to die?"

Produced by ABC Australia
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

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